University of Hawaiʻi System News /news News from the University of Hawaii Sat, 24 Feb 2024 01:58:07 +0000 en-US hourly 1 /news/wp-content/uploads/2019/04/cropped-xxxxɫƬNews512-1-32x32.jpg University of Hawaiʻi System News /news 32 32 xxxxɫƬ ԴDz extends enrollment deadline to June 1 /news/2024/02/23/uh-manoa-enrollment-deadline-june-1/ Sat, 24 Feb 2024 01:58:07 +0000 /news/?p=192424 Reading time: 2 minutes The application deadline for new on-campus housing has also been extended to June 1.

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students sitting on steps
Students at xxxxɫƬ ԴDz

The is extending the enrollment deadline in 2024 from May 1 to June 1 as the federal government has delayed the release of financial information to colleges and universities around the country. The application deadline for new on-campus housing has also been extended to June 1.

The Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA), is used by tens of millions of college students each year to apply for federal financial aid. The information is also used by schools to award scholarships and provide assistance through other aid programs. This year, the FAFSA process is experiencing delays after a system upgrade including a new streamlined form.

xxxxɫƬ ԴDz joins a growing number of colleges and universities around the country that are responding to the system delay by extending the enrollment deadline.

“We understand that many families are waiting to understand the full picture of what level of financial aid they will receive before making a decision on which campus they should attend,” said xxxxɫƬ ԴDz Vice Provost for Enrollment Management Nikki Chun. “We are grateful that students and their ʻohana consider xxxxɫƬ ԴDz for their education as we have such a wide range of programs and faculty who are among the top in their fields.”

The flagship campus of the 10-campus xxxxɫƬ system, xxxxɫƬ ԴDz offers more than 99 different and consistently ranks among the top universities in research and academic success. A bachelor’s degree from xxxxɫƬ earns a graduate an average of $2.8 million more over their lifetime compared to those without a degree, according to a 2024 report from the xxxxɫƬ Economic Resource Organization (xxxxɫƬERO).

“All of the data show that higher education is a worthwhile investment, and you don’t have to leave Hawaiʻi to receive a quality education that’s also affordable,” xxxxɫƬ ԴDz Provost Michael Bruno. “I hope students who are thinking about college and want to make a difference here in Hawaiʻi strongly consider xxxxɫƬ ԴDz. We will provide the education and tools you need for a successful career and fulfilling life, as we all work to make our state a better place for generations to come.”

For more information, please visit the .

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Cesspools to solutions: Initiative targets Pacific islands’ wastewater woes /news/2024/02/23/wastewater-challenges-pacific-islands/ Fri, 23 Feb 2024 22:49:41 +0000 /news/?p=192412 Reading time: 2 minutes At the end of the project, the team plans to deliver a proof-of-concept, island-appropriate, prototype wastewater infrastructure system.

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landscape and skyline of buildings and ocean

A notable challenge for island water resources is wastewater management, often reliant on inadequate cesspools. In Hawaiʻi, the 83,000 cesspools across the state are estimated to leak 52 million gallons of untreated wastewater daily into the environment, endangering aquifers and coastal areas.

To address this issue, researchers from the University of Hawaiʻi at ԴDz’s and will work with a team from several other universities and organizations to develop wastewater management technologies tailored to island environments. The project earned a $650,000 grant from the National Science Foundation (NSF). It is to develop innovative technologies and solutions to improve U.S. freshwater systems.

“Treated wastewater creates a new source of clean water for non-potable purposes, such as irrigation and firefighting, significantly reducing pressure on freshwater supply and contributing to a more sustainable water future,” said Zhiyue Wang, project co-principal investigator and assistant professor from the and Water Resources Research Center.

At the end of the project, the team plans to deliver a proof-of-concept, island-appropriate, prototype wastewater infrastructure system, and an initial framework for a wastewater rating system. They will work with community partners, local wastewater professionals and the xxxxɫƬ ԴDz , to broaden participation by underrepresented students and researchers and engage the community to assist under-resourced residents with cesspools in Hawaiʻi.

Also involved in the project is Professor Tao Yan from the Department of Civil, Environmental and Construction Engineering and Water Resources Research Center. Yan has conducted several projects in Hawaiʻi related to water quality and environmental microbiology. Some of those projects include: investigating possible dangers of chromium in Maui soil following the devastating wildfires, and testing Honolulu’s wastewater for the prevalence of the COVID-19 virus.

“Our islands have limited water resources, so developing a wastewater solution to prevent water pollution and protect the environment and human health is critical.” Yan said. “The solution can also be used to address similar issues in other islands across the Pacific, providing a much-needed tool to alleviate water quality stresses and to enable better stewardship of the natural resources.”

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Pandemic recovery ending, construction up, xxxxɫƬERO forecasts /news/2024/02/23/uhero-first-quarter-forecast-2024/ Fri, 23 Feb 2024 10:01:23 +0000 /news/?p=192391 Reading time: 3 minutes Hawaiʻi’s visitor industry showed resilience in 2023, with real visitor spending hovering near historic highs in the first quarter.

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Lāhainā street fire damage

Hawaiʻi’s economy has been sustained by a resilient U.S. economy and the gradual return of international visitors. According to the ’s (xxxxɫƬERO) first quarter forecast for 2024, with the islands’ post-pandemic recovery now largely complete, the economy will downshift this year, and growth will increasingly come from local sources, including a robust construction sector bolstered by the rebuilding of Lahaina, Maui.

“On the Valley Isle, the initial visitor recovery after the wildfires has proven somewhat stronger than expected, but rebuilding will take a long time, with many uncertainties about how this will play out,” according to the forecast.

Key takeaways from the February 23 report:

  • The U.S. economy is off to a positive start in 2024, characterized by strong consumer spending, still-healthy job markets and substantial progress on inflation. This makes a “soft landing” now more likely than not. Challenges such as credit delinquencies and reduced savings will moderate consumer spending this year, while high interest rates continue to impact some sectors. Global economic challenges, including weakness abroad and the strong dollar, will keep U.S. economic growth just below 2%.
  • Hawaiʻi’s visitor industry showed resilience in 2023, with real visitor spending hovering near historic highs in the first quarter. There was some weakening of the industry even before the Maui wildfires, which of course dealt a heavy blow to the Valley Isle. U.S. visitor arrivals eased a bit in the second half of 2023, partly offset by an uptick in Canadian and Japanese visitors, although the latter still lag by half their pre-pandemic level. Per person visitor spending has risen, but challenges remain, including the poor purchasing power of foreign currencies. Visitor arrivals will see modest growth of 2% this year, and real visitor spending will soften.
  • The construction industry has been buoyed by large federal and state contracts, as well as robust home building on Oʻahu. To meet the needs of Maui rebuilding, the industry will expand further, adding 2,500 workers over the next three years.
  • The Maui Interim Housing Plan allocates $500 million to fund housing for families displaced by the wildfires, primarily through a leasing program targeting vacation rentals. Recovery efforts focus on debris removal and rebuilding permits, with grants offered for ʻohana unit construction to address the housing shortage. Nonetheless, recovery remains a long road ahead.
  • High housing costs are a challenge throughout the islands. To address this, state and county governments are pushing to increase restrictions on short-term rentals, hoping to encourage owners to return these properties to long-term housing. While several proposals have been floated, the relatively small incentives may not have a substantial impact on the housing stock. Other initiatives that support the building of new homes are more promising.
  • While the labor market recovery on Maui was stronger than expected following the wildfires—supported by an already tight labor market—the pace of improvement in unemployment insurance claims has slowed. Unfortunately, workers who first filed for benefits in the weeks after the fire will begin losing eligibility this month.
  • Elsewhere in the state, labor markets remain healthy. Employment has held steady or increased slightly on Hawaiʻi Island, Oʻahu and Kauaʻi. There are differences in county labor market performance associated with different population trends. Net population growth on the Big Island has raised the labor force above pre-pandemic levels, while the other counties remain 3%–4% below their pre-COVID levels.
  • The slowing of population and labor force growth is a long-term phenomenon and will cause job and income growth rates to trend lower than in the past. Over the next three years, payrolls will grow at a less than 1% average annual rate, while real income will expand at about 1.7% per year.

xxxxɫƬERO is housed in xxxxɫƬ ԴDz’s .

To read the entire report, .

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Transportation Secretary Buttigieg visits Leeward CC, checks on rail /news/2024/02/22/buttigieg-visits-leeward-cc/ Fri, 23 Feb 2024 01:58:54 +0000 /news/?p=192388 Reading time: 2 minutes Buttigieg rode the Skyline rail from Leeward CC to Halawa.

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Pete Buttigieg passing through the rail gates

U.S. Secretary of Transportation Pete Buttigieg toured the rail transit facility behind Leeward Community College and was welcomed to campus’ Hālaulani station for a ride on the Skyline metro to Halawa, during his February visit to Hawaiʻi. The station is located alongside Ala ʻIke Street and can be accessed from a building on the campus.

Pete Buttigieg talking to Rick Blangiardi
Pete Buttigieg  talking with people

The station opened in June 2023 and is the only one in the system not built on elevated tracks. Officials from the State Department of Transportation and the City and County of Honolulu, including Mayor Rick Blangiardi, discussed the project with Buttigieg.

“It was a pleasure joining our city, state and federal officials in welcoming Secretary Buttigieg for his first ride on Skyline, and learning about how local culture and history are tied to the naming and art at the station, and its connection to Leeward Community College,” said Chancellor Carlos Peñaloza.

Prior to his Leeward CC visit, Buttigieg had been on Maui to see the devastation in Lahaina from the wildfires and meet with officials there about transportation projects. How climate change will impact shoreline roadways and more throughout the island state was another topic of discussion during his trip.

Pete Buttigieg  walking with people

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Health programs collaborate for better patient care /news/2024/02/22/health-programs-collaborate-better-patient-care/ Thu, 22 Feb 2024 22:21:21 +0000 /news/?p=192374 Reading time: 2 minutes Students learned to reach across healthcare specialties to support patients’ wishes.

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Students working at the table
Working on patient discharge plan

More than 70 students across various health programs at gained valuable insights into the multifaceted nature of providing patient-centered age-appropriate care through a symposium in January.

Students working at a table
Health program students developing patient management plans

Community Health Education Program Director Hilary Hacker said, “This symposium, created from a shared commitment to excellence in healthcare training, aims to transcend traditional silos.”

The collaboration with the University of Hawaiʻi’s Geriatrics Workforce Enhancement Program drew students from practical nursing, community health worker, physical therapy assistant, occupational therapy assistant, respiratory care practitioner and medical assisting.

It is helpful to see the aspects of patient care through the lens of other health professionals
—Elizabeth Kalahiki, respiratory care student

“I genuinely enjoyed interacting with all the health science students,” said Jesse Temple, a student in the physical therapist assistant program. “Not only was I able to understand how to establish a better patient plan of care, but my knowledge was enhanced on each representative’s role within the health care team. I can’t wait to work alongside each and every one of them!”

xxxxɫƬ ԴDz Professor and Geriatric Medicine Chair Kamal Masaki prefaced the symposium with insights on “Developing an Age-Friendly Health System,” after which student groups were introduced to a geriatrics case to identify issues and develop preliminary management plans. Actors representing a patient and his daughter shared what mattered most to them, and the teams reconvened to adjust their plans with those considerations.

“It was beneficial to witness and understand how important every field is when working together for the ultimate care and needs of the patient,” said practical nursing student Skye Kalehuawehe. “I know that this experience will help me advance as a future nurse and that I can use these skills learned today to my advantage to give the best possible care to those in need.”

Student teams presented their care plans, followed by a panel discussion where faculty and professionals from diverse healthcare fields shared their clinical experiences and discussed lessons learned.
“This was a great opportunity to collaborate with other health fields to formulate a plan from varying perspectives with the patient’s wishes in mind,” said Elizabeth Kalahiki, a respiratory care student. “It is helpful to see the aspects of patient care through the lens of other health professionals. As a future respiratory care practitioner, I had a chance to see how patient care continues after discharge, as most of our involvement has been in an acute setting.”

Students smiling
Kapiʻolani CC health program students
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xxxxɫƬ ԴDz initiatives aim to promote alcohol education /news/2024/02/22/uh-manoa-initiatives-alcoholedu/ Thu, 22 Feb 2024 21:58:46 +0000 /news/?p=192371 Reading time: 3 minutes xxxxɫƬ Mānoa’s comprehensive alcohol education programs equip students with knowledge, resources and support for responsible alcohol use.

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Students walking on U H Manoa campus

In an effort to better prepare University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa students to make responsible alcohol usage choices, the has introduced the campus to , a national online program designed to educate college students about alcohol use, misuse and potential consequences.

AlcoholEdu features interactive modules featuring videos, quizzes and scenarios that cover topics related to alcohol and other drug consumption. The content is personalized for students at xxxxɫƬ Mānoa.

hand waving away wine bottle

“These initiatives promote the health and safety of students by equipping them with knowledge about the potential physical and mental health consequences of substance misuse, as well as strategies for responsible decision-making,” said Alcohol and Other Drug Counselor Kuʻulei Salzer, from the University Health Services Mānoa, Health Promotion. “Moreover, education and ongoing support programs help students maintain their academic performance by mitigating the negative impact of substance misuse on concentration, memory and overall well-being.”

xxxxɫƬ Mānoa students are strongly encouraged .

Fostering alcohol-healthy student relationships

In addition to AlcoholEdu, students are also encouraged to attend BASICS (Brief Alcohol Screening and Intervention for College Students), a program that provides them with personalized feedback on their alcohol use patterns and associated risks.

Through BASICS, students are educated on responsible drinking practices, coping mechanisms for managing stress and peer pressure, and goal-setting techniques, empowering students to develop healthier relationships with alcohol and navigate social situations more safely.

Students who feel they need additional support for their alcohol or other drug use can complete the to schedule a session with Salzer. More information can be found at the University Health Services website.

Perceptions of alcohol consumption

To determine student perceptions of alcohol usage, Health Promotion conducted a Mānoa Alcohol Project Survey, finding that 15% of students believe that their peers drink every day—in reality, the amount total is less than 1% of students drinking daily.

“This misperception could lead other students to believe that heavy drinking is a normal part of the college experience, when in reality, the majority of students are making low-risk choices when it comes to alcohol,” said Salzer. “By educating young adults about alcohol and drug use, we can bring more clarity and reinforce the actual substance use norms at xxxxɫƬ Mānoa.”

Safe space to seek help

At xxxxɫƬ Mānoa, a is implemented with the primary goal of encouraging students to seek help in alcohol-related emergencies.

“We aim to create a safe space for students to ask for help, and under this policy, if they seek medical assistance for themselves or others, they are granted certain protections from disciplinary action related to underage drinking,” explained Theresa Crichfield, associate vice provost for student success and xxxxɫƬ Mānoa dean of students. “This is something we applied informally in the past, and when the Good Samaritan Policy was passed in 2015, we officially formalized this practice at xxxxɫƬ Mānoa.”

By addressing substance abuse proactively, students are supported in their personal development, and empowered to navigate social pressures effectively, boosting their overall success and well-being.

For any questions or concerns, students can email alcohol@hawaii.edu, or visit the University Health Services website for more information.

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Native Hawaiian Organizations invest in xxxxɫƬ students, communities /news/2024/02/22/native-hawaiian-organizations-invest-in-uh-students/ Thu, 22 Feb 2024 20:50:12 +0000 /news/?p=192359 Reading time: 3 minutes Alakaʻina Foundation and The Hawaiʻi Pacific Foundation lead Native Hawaiian Organizations investing in xxxxɫƬ.

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More than two dozen Native Hawaiian Organizations have given to xxxxɫƬ campuses and programs.

Hundreds of Native Hawaiian students have been able to attend a University of Hawaiʻi campus thanks to the financial investments of Native Hawaiian Organizations (NHOs). NHOs are nonprofits that also have majority ownership in one or more for-profit small businesses that compete for federal contracts, and whose profits are returned to Native Hawaiian communities.

More than two dozen NHOs have given to xxxxɫƬ, with and taking the lead, investing a combined $5 million over the past five years. These gifts are helping to grow a pipeline of Native Hawaiian leaders to address social, economic and cultural issues.

Alakaʻina Foundation

headshot
Tevita Hala Latu

Tevita Hala Latu of Hilo is in his second year of studying for a fire science degree at Hawaiʻi Community College with the aid of an Alakaʻina Foundation xxxxɫƬ Community College Scholarship. Hala Latu plans to become a firefighter after he graduates and said the scholarship has allowed him to focus on being a full-time student and to pay for books, supplies and materials.

“I couldn’t do it without you,” Hala Latu wrote in a letter of appreciation to Alakaʻina Foundation. “I will prove to you that your investment was well spent. I am currently a 3.8 GPA student and I am motivated to do better. Mahalo, Mahalo, Mahalo for your support!”

large group of people holding a check
Alakaʻina Foundation presented gifts to xxxxɫƬ at an event at Windward Community College in August 2023.

Alakaʻina dzܲԻ岹پDz’s xxxxɫƬ Community College Scholarship supports students pursuing degrees or certificates in vocational and technical fields. The foundation also supports, the Digital Bus Program and scholarships at Kauaʻi Community College; xxxxɫƬ Hilo’s Ka Haka ʻUla O Keʻelikōlani College of Hawaiian Language; the xxxxɫƬ Mānoa Hawaiʻinuiākea School of Hawaiian Knowledge; xxxxɫƬ West Oʻahu; Leeward Community College; and Windward Community College.

The Hawaiʻi Pacific Foundation

9 people
Angilynne Pekelo-Cedillo

Angilynne Pekelo-Cedillo of Waiʻanae was able to complete her master’s degree in social work at the xxxxɫƬ Mānoa Thompson School of Social Work & Public Health last year with support from The Hawaiʻi Pacific dzܲԻ岹پDz’s Haumana Scholarship.

“As a non-traditional [student and] Native Hawaiian mother of seven children, returning to school was difficult financially,” she said. “I owe part of my success to people that make up organizations and foundations that invest in people like me.”

six people holding a check
The Hawaiʻi Pacific Foundation presented gifts to several xxxxɫƬ colleges in January 2024.

The Hawaiʻi Pacific Foundation has given multiple gifts to support xxxxɫƬ Mānoa’s Thompson School of Social Work & Public Health, School of Ocean & Earth Science and Technology, Linguistics Department, Native Hawaiian Center of Excellence at the John A. Burns School of Medicine and Hawaiʻinuiākea School of Hawaiian Knowledge, and xxxxɫƬ West Oʻahu.

For more, go to the .

Related xxxxɫƬ News stories:

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xxxxɫƬ tennis player earns first Big West Player of the Week honor /news/2024/02/21/snyder-big-west-player-of-the-week/ Thu, 22 Feb 2024 02:32:00 +0000 /news/?p=192351 Reading time: < 1 minute xxxxɫƬ Mānoa men’s tennis player Quinn Snyder helped the Rainbow Warriors edge out Concordia University Irvine.

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Quinn Snyder

University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa player Quinn Snyder earned his first Big West Player of the Week award. Snyder helped the Rainbow Warriors edge out Concordia University Irvine (CUI), 4-3 by winning both No. 1 singles and No. 1 doubles on the road on February 18.

Snyder opened xxxxɫƬ’s second roadtrip of the year with a doubles victory with partner Andy Hernandez over CUI’s Mario Aleksic and Spencer Cinco, 6-3. Snyder then swept his singles match over Max Renz, 6-2, 6-3 to give xxxxɫƬ a 2-0 lead against the Golden Eagles.

Snyder is now 3-2 in singles all at No. 1 and 3-1 in doubles with Hernandez on the No. 1 court.

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xxxxɫƬ News Image of the Week: Valentine’s Day /news/2024/02/21/uh-news-image-of-the-week-valentines-day/ Wed, 21 Feb 2024 18:00:45 +0000 /news/?p=192263 Reading time: < 1 minute This week’s image is from Leeward Community College.

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Students smiling in front of a valentine's day wall

This week’s xxxxɫƬ News Image of the Week is from the Leeward Community College .

Students enjoyed the Valentine’s Day event at and .

Previous Images
Jersey day
Nice morning
Garden flowers
Colville’s Glory
Mala at Wailupe beach
All Images of the Week

Send us your image!

Want to get in on the action? The next xxxxɫƬ News Image of the Week could be yours! Submit a photo, drawing, painting, digital illustration of a project you are working on, a moment from a field research outing or a beautiful and/or interesting shot of a scene on your campus. It could be a class visit during which you see an eye-catching object or scene.

  • .

Please include a brief description of the image and its connection to your campus, class assignment or other xxxxɫƬ connection. By submitting your image, you are giving xxxxɫƬ News permission to publish your photo on the xxxxɫƬ News website and xxxxɫƬ social media accounts. The image must be your original work, and anyone featured in your image needs to give consent to its publication.

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Hawaiian Word of the Week: ʻIke /news/2024/02/20/hawaiian-word-of-the-week-ike/ Wed, 21 Feb 2024 08:52:41 +0000 /news/?p=192256 Reading time: < 1 minute ʻIke—To see, know, feel, recognize, perceive, experience.

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—To see, know, feel, recognize, perceive, experience.

Previous ʻōlelo
Paʻahana
Mohala
Ulu
Ui
ō첹
All ʻŌlelo of the Week

“Knowledge isn’t just a destination; it’s the compass guiding my college journey. Each lecture, every book, and every conversation fuels not only my education but also the evolution of my perspective.”

—Quentin Shores, marine biology undergraduate, University of Hawaiʻi at ԴDz.

For more information on other elements of the definition and usage, go to the xxxxɫƬ Hilo .

Olelo of the week

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